Culinary tutoring a cut above the rest

By: Stefany Olivas, Managing Editor | Photo By: Stefany Olivas, Managing Editor

Culinary tutors are available for students in need of help with learning dif­ferent culinary con­cepts, said Part-time Culinary Instructor Brianna Dennis.

The tutors use many approaches to help stu­dents learn the material from their classes like visual aids in the cooking lab, or hands-on work­sheets the students would use in the industry.

“I love seeing students succeed, and watching them make the connec­tion. Seeing them learn about their passion only increases their motiva­tion to feed their passion which amazing to me,” said Dennis.

The culinary tutors are located in Smith Brasher Hall near the cooking labs to make it easier for culinary stu­dents to access them.

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Deplorable portables

By: Shaya Rogers, Staff Reporter | Photo By: Scott M. Roberts, Photojournalist

Part time instructors unhappy with office space

The part-time instructor offices located in the portable buildings West of Ken Chappy Hall on Main campus are in serious need of mainte­nance. Not only do the instructors lack any sort of privacy, but there are also doors, desks, win­dows and carpets in need of repair.

Part-time Journalism Instructor Maggie Shepard said there needs to be more priority for maintenance of the part-time offices.

“There has been more attention to part-time needs since I’ve been here, but a lot of us feel like it’s still not enough to make us feel wanted and appre­ciated,” she said.

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Lack of participation leaves student group without officers

By: Shaya Rogers, Staff Reporter

Lack of student involvement has left many officer posi­tions available, said SkillsUSA Historian Abran Salazar.

Students within the technical trades program decide the outcome of the elec­tions, but not many know about the orga­nization, which gives students the opportu­nity to further pre­pare and win competi­tions in various trades programs, he said.

“We really didn’t have a lot of students that had applied, there was only one at the beginning so we had to really push it that day,” he said.

SkillsUSA is a campus organization that prepares students in various trade pro­grams for success in their career.

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Game on

By: Stefany Olivas, Managing Editor | Photo Illustration By: Jonathan Gamboa, Production Manager

Former student organizes second charity event

The second annual Child’s Play Gaming Tournament is projected to have a turnout of 200 individuals, said former General Studies major and event organizer Ryan Leonski.

The Dec. 2 tourna­ment in the UNM Student Union Building will give gamers the opportunity to be crowned the cham­pion while raising money people participated in tournaments for video, board, or card games for charity, he said.

“I really just wanted to help out in some way,” he said.

The $12 entrance from each participant is donated to UNM Children’s Hospital for the purchase of video games and sys­tems for children to use during their hospital stay, he said.

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Twinkle Light parade moving to Nob Hill

By: Adriana Avila, Staff Reporter

This year, the Nob Hill Shop and Stroll has partnered with the Twinkle Light Parade to save resources, said Special Events Manager Eric Werner.

The Nob Hill Merchants Association and Nob Hill Main Street usually organize the Shop and Stroll while the City of Albuquerque organizes the Twinkle Light Parade. Werner said it would be more efficient to combine the events because each uses the same resources.

“There were two events that had to close Central, so by com­bining it we would be combining resources and we could also combine resources when it comes to pro­motion and market­ing and the economic impact,” said Werner.

The Shop and Stroll is usually on a Thursday but this year it will take place on Saturday, Dec. 1 from noon to midnight.

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10 Minutes with… Sarah Egelman

By: Jonathan Baca, Senior Reporter | Photo By: Jonathan Gamboa, Production Manager

The ghosts of holidays past

From the worship of the Roman god Saturn to the crowds at the mall on Black Friday, Christmas has evolved with each new culture that celebrates it, said Part-time Religious Studies Instructor Sarah Egelman.

Some of the season’s most cherished traditions have surprising origins, she said. The celebration itself is a result of the many hardships societies faced during the winter months.

“It’s the middle of winter, and life is hard. So people have always had fes­tive celebrations this time of year,” said Egelman.

Early Christians first agreed to celebrate the birth of Jesus on Dec. 25 around the fourth cen­tury, she said. They knew this was not the actual day that Jesus was born, but chose that date to gain followers, she said.

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Instructor collects 1,600 books for students

By: Daniel Johnson, Staff Reporter | Photo By: Stefany Olivas, Managing Editor

The goal was to col­lect one novel for every student enrolled in the developmental read­ing program, said Full-time SAGE Instructor Patrick Flink.

Flink wanted to enable students so they could practice reading on material other than home­work, he said.

“Getting a student excited about reading in general is a great foun­dation for continuing that student’s educa­tion,” he said.

Flink, who is col­lecting and handing out the books on his own, hopes to col­lect 2,000 books before the end of the term, he said. So far, 1,600 books have been donated and more are coming in, he said.

“When the whole thing started I was thinking maybe I would get 100 or 200 books, but people really responded,” said Flink.

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Holiday events

By: Jonathan Baca, Staff Reporter

It’s the most wonderful time of year again, and Albuquerque is buzzing with things to do. Here is a list of things the Chronicle recommends.

River of Lights

What: The Albuquerque Botanic Gardens becomes a wonderland of light sculptures this time of year. Local musicians, dinner at the Shark Reef Café and free arts and crafts projects on the first three Wednesdays make this a great one for the kids, too.

Where: Albuquerque Botanic Gardens

When: Nov. 24 to Dec. 13, 6-9 p.m.; Dec. 14 to 30, 6-10 p.m.; Closed Dec. 24 and 25

Cost: Adults- $10, Children 3-13 yrs- $5; Children under 3- free

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Holiday helpers

By: Adriana Avila, Staff Reporter

How to help this holiday season

In Albuquerque there are an estimated 17,000 homeless people and the majority are children. It is easy to forget these num­bers or someone sitting on a street corner because everyone has his own struggles to deal with. This holiday season instead of giving them a shrug or a stare, give them some extra time and resources. It is a great gift and it is not expensive. Listed below are a few organizations that offer these resources and would love a helping hand.

Food Delivery Once per Month

5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite 200

The Jewish Family Service of New Mexico is a hands-on program that deliv­ers food boxes the first Thursday of every month to homebound seniors. The service is in need of drivers to deliver boxes. For more information, visit jfsnm.org or call Debbie Garduño at 348-4514.

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Sun Cat Chit-Chat

By: Shaya Rogers, Staff Reporter | Photos By: Stefany Olivas, Managing Editor

What is your plan for the zombie apocolypse?

Andre Lynch, Radiology

“Just be happy and be natural because I know I’m gonna be saved by God. I have a really good outlook on it.”

Carol Washburn, Elementary Education

“My plan? I really don’t think about that. I would find some place to hide and take my sister, she really wouldn’t like to be around zombies.”

Jasmine Carpenter, Nutrition and General Health

“I’m being really optimistic and I’m hoping that we’re not gonna have a zombie apocalypse, but worst-case scenario, I would hope that I could find some kind of underground bunker and get in with people who know what’s going on because I’m not very zombie savvy.”

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