Disturbance in SRC leads to arrest

By: Jonathan Baca, Senior Reporter | Photo Courtesy: Bernco.gov, Web

A man was arrested after a violent outburst in the Student Resource Center on Main campus earlier last week.

APD and Campus Security were called to the SRC on Tuesday, Jan. 22 in response to calls about a man who witnesses said was throwing chairs, yelling pro­fanities and threat­ening violence.

The man, later identified as former Computer Information Systems major Salomon Gallegos, was arrested on charges of Criminal Trespass and Disorderly Conduct, accord­ing to the APD report.

A phone number for Gallegos was not listed, and the Chronicle was unable to reach him.

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Former lib. arts major calls for CYFD reform

By: Jyllian Roach, Editor-in-chief

Former Liberal Arts Major Mikki Browne said she thinks the Children, Youth and Families Department is in need of reform, and she plans to make it happen.

Browne said that after her two children went into foster care, she noticed that the system at CYFD seemed to be out of touch with its goal to help parents and keep kids safe.

“It seemed like if a parent had problems with drug or alcohol addiction, they go to rehab and a parenting class and have their kids back in three months. But if the parent was impoverished like me — if they had trouble finding a job or a home, then it would be at least a year,” said Browne.

Browne said that her plan is to speak with local and state representa­tives, including Governor Susana Martinez, and create a plan that would reform CYFD so that families can be reunited when the problem stems from poverty rather than abuse or neglect.

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Internal Revenue Service calls for change in part-time instructor pay calculation

By: Adriana Avila, Managing Editor

Full-time Math Instructor and President of the CNM Teacher’s Union Andy Tibble said he is excited that the IRS is calling for more accurate calculation of part-time instruc­tor’s hours.

The reconsidera­tion of part-time faculty hours will result in a more secure work envi­ronment that will result in better benefits for all instructors, he said.

“Full-time faculty pretty much have a guarantee of a job and a foreseeable future. I hope the administra­tion abides by the IRS’s guidelines,” he said.

Tibble said the Affordable Health Care Act has given light to a larger issue; the lack of benefits given to part-time employees.

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Public education bill could impact remedial class sizes

By: Daniel Johnson, Staff Reporter

A recent bill, pro­posed by Governor Susana Martinez, could lower the number of stu­dents who need reme­dial courses at CNM.

The “No Social Promotions” education reform bill calls for public school teachers’ salaries to be based on the success of their stu­dents, as an attempt to improve low test scores in the state.

Department Chair of Reading and College Success Kenneth Chavez said the pro­posed bill could be the first step to looking at and adjusting educa­tion across the state as a whole.

“Success on a high school level may need to be judged off of mental preparedness as well as intellectual devel­opment to ensure that students are receiving the education necessary to move onto the next level,” he said.

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Student combines fitness and philanthropy to make a difference

By: Shaya Rogers, Staff Reporter

 When Business Major Hillary Barrows heard about a fire at a local homeless shelter, she said she was determined to help the organization while also helping the Albuquerque community.

Fit &Give is a not-for-profit program that will help students and mem­bers of the community reach their weight loss goals, while collecting money for Joy Junction.

Participants will meet in the Student Resource Center on Main Campus on Feb. 1 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. to begin the 12-week program.

“I’m hosting a fitness and weight loss chal­lenge and it’s similar to a Walkathon. Per pound lost, people will give pledges,” she said.

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Punk band combines style and study for unique sound

By: Shaya Rogers, Staff Reporter | Photo By: Shaya Rogers

Band members of Pepper Griswald.Local band Pepper Griswald has woven together the classic punk music style with deep topics from history, litera­ture and even philosophy for a new take on old ideas.

The four-member band, comprised of lead vocalist Chris Romero, drummer Kevin Bott, guitarist David Castillo and bassist Danny Crouch, has been conquering the local punk scene since forming in mid-2012.

“Lyrically I take a lot from things I’ve learned from philosophy and his­tory. It plays a part in the lyrical content of the songs,” said Paralegal Studies Major Chris Romero.

The band has a do-it-yourself garage style, but the sound is hard to describe specifically, he said.

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Student’s-only days available at Tax Help NM

By: Daniel Johnson, Staff Reporter

 Tax Help New Mexico is offering a spe­cial student-only week for tax assistance, said Executive Director of CNM Connect, Ann Lyn Hall.

From Jan. 31 to Feb. 2, registered students will be able to get free tax assistance without the long lines seen during the regular open period, she said.

“It is often expensive to get taxes done so this is a really nice opportu­nity for students,” said Hall. After Feb. 2, Tax Help New Mexico will be open to all mem­bers of the community through April 15.

“Lines for taxes can be really long, but if students utilize the stu­dent-only days then the wait should not be as bad,” said Hall.

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Viable Earth: Upcycling for environment and society

By: Stefany Olivas, Guest Writer

The effects of sustainability can be difficult to grasp. Health, energy, economics and inevitably, the environment have a single concept that links them — sustainability. Over the course of this term, guest writer Stefany Olivas, a biology major with a concentration in sustainability, will explore the issues and concepts involved in “going green.”

Upcycling, the practice of repurposing an object for another use, has become a popular practice. Communications Major Dana Chandler and Nutrition Major Ernest Padilla-Garcia are two such people.

C h a n d l e r said she started Project Reuse New Mexico to encourage resi­dents to reuse dis­posable products, as a way to help the environment.

The idea began after a geology class in which students studied the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and a Public Speaking class where she used persuasive speech to encourage her classmates to use reus­able plastic bottles and grocery bags, she said.

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Letter to the Editor: Response to Vol. 18 Iss. 18 ‘Shooting Club flyers create controversy’

Critical thinking is perhaps the most important thing I hope to impart to my students here at CNM. Thus I was extremely dis­mayed to see such blatant illogical fallacy coming from a psychology major in your article “Shooting Club flyers create controversy.” This student said, as quoted by you, “I don’t want to be in a class­room with someone who has a concealed carry gun legally and then, if for some reason, they thought someone else was pull­ing a gun and they weren’t, or even if they were, they could pull that gun and shoot me or anyone else by mistake.”

Let’s see…you have someone who is carrying a gun illegally, intent on shooting and killing as many people as he can (because that seems to be the point of the game) on the one hand, and a trained citizen carrying legally, intent on stopping the shooter and protecting everyone else, on the other hand. Let’s see…crim­inal…law-abiding citizen. This student would prefer to take her chances with the criminal, who WILL shoot her on purpose, because the law-abiding citizen MIGHT shoot her accidentally?

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Letter to the Editor: Response to Vol. 18 Iss. 16 ‘Terminated instructor continues fight to clear the record’

The CNM Chronicle has published several sto­ries regarding a full-time faculty member who was terminated, following an internal investigation, for using physical force against a fellow faculty member on CNM property. The deci­sion to terminate the faculty member was upheld by an independent arbitrator.

While the situation was difficult for everyone con­cerned, one of the most troubling aspects of the situation was the biased reporting of the story and, particularly, the dismis­sive treatment of the victim. Stories in the Chronicle appeared slanted to favor a man accused of using exces­sive force against a woman, while discounting and dis­crediting the victim’s side of the story. The woman was victimized a second time in the Chronicle stories.

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