Editorials

Editorial : Providing childcare at Main campus

Editorial, By the CNM Chroni­cle Editorial Board

In relation to the day care and no kids’ policy in the student resource center stories on the front page of this issue, one has to wonder if CNM officials even care if single parents succeed at this school.

Because the day care associated with CNM only providing child care for 3 to 5 year -olds and has a cap of 38 children, this facility only helps a small population of the student parent community and is not a viable resource for the stu­dent-parent population.

The Chronicle applauds Torrey Moorman, Khoa Pham and Karissa Trebizo for their innovative idea of proposing a student-run daycare here at main campus and following through with trying to make it a reality. This idea could truly help struggling parents with not having to worry about where they can have their children on campus and can provide an ongoing program to help student parents succeed.

Some students have it hard enough with limited class availabil­ity in some majors, and have tight schedules with classes, a job, and children to take care of on top of all that, which can sometimes be over­whelming. Student parents some­times have to drop classes because they cannot fit four to eight hour courses, (depending on major) into their daily lives. Especially during summer semesters, and with the implementation of more eight-week courses, students sometimes have no choice but to bring their chil­dren with them to campus, which has proven to be an issue at certain campus locations. Students should have a safe place where they can bring their children to campus— for a low, or no-cost fee—because so many students at this school are parents learning a specific trade.

Having a place on campus for all student parents is something that should already be in place. With costs for child-care soaring, student parents have a hard enough time finding proper daycare facili­ties for their children, especially in the area surrounding the college. Student loan changes are alter­ing the way student parents are helped with financial aid and since resources are being tightened this proposal would be ideal to help keep student parents in school.

With students selectively being asked to leave resource rooms in the SRC because their children are with them, this proposal could stop any further such events from happening. Students could take their children to an onsite facility and be able to use resources without feeling demeaned for having to get an assignment in, or use software only available to them through the school.

A student-run day-care could also help majors going into teach­ing fields, and if proposed work-study or credited internships were to occur students could have yet another resource to learn from in a real teaching environment.

High schools throughout Albuquerque already have similar programs with child-care classes that are incorporated into day-cares on campus that have been successful for more than a decade. Also, col­leges throughout the United States have day-care centers for student parents that facilitate the popula­tion of the school’s students.

Our school should think about getting up with the times and con­sider opening a student-run day care center to at least try it out, because many schools have done the same and have great programs for student parents that benefit both the school and student.

Going back to school can be tough, especially for a struggling parent, and having a campus day care center could really help stu­dents with the convenience of being able to have their children at an easily accessible location through­out a students’ school day, and can help students to focus on school and class instead of personal matters of being able to afford proper day care.

The Chronicle hopes that the school’s officials take the time to hear the upcoming proposal from the three students mentioned and can come to an agreement on how to better the college for student parents to help those parents do well, and be able to successfully graduate from CNM.

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