UNM Pond starts to Get Ducks in a Row

By Mark Graven

Staff Reporter

On a brilliant sunny afternoon of September 15th, at the UNM Duck Pond, the duck population is growing, and calling itself to order.

In midsummer, the duck population had fallen below 20 ducks. Now ducks are returning from their summer vacations in northern latitudes, and beginning to settle in for fall and winter.

Today there are more than forty ducks, paddling about, or watching from the pond’s edge, where they naturally line up in rows to observe the turtles, sunning on pond rocks, and humans who recline in the shade of trees, or sit on benches surrounding the water.

It’s a far cry from the hundreds of ducks the pond regularly hosts in the winter, and certainly not enough to impress the turtles, who are rock-solid residents of the pond year around. Yes, indeed, the turtles are hard to impress.

Graduation Issue 2018

Story and photos by Audrey Scherer,

staff reporter

Ashley Shickler,

Staff Reporter

 

Daniel Sanchez

Daniel Sanchez

GED

 

Plans after graduation

His dream job is to become an ER nurse and he would like to write a book about his experiences in the ER, he said.

“I’m really excited at this moment. All at the same time extremely nervous,” he said.

 

Advice for students

Do not give up. Keep trying and anyone can eventually succeed, he said.

“Once you do, it will be one of the best moments of your life,” he said.

 

Experience with CNM

CNM provides students with an individualized experience which makes them feel like the whole school is supporting them, he said.

 

 

Monica Prince

Monica Prince

GED

 

Advice for students

“As I got older, I understood that education is really important,” she said.

 

Reason for college

She wanted to further her education not just in cosmetology, but academically to have a back-up plan for providing a better life for her son, she said.

 

 

Kailyn Aragon

 

Kailyn Aragon

Child Development Certificate

 

Advice for students

The long hours get hard, especially if you work full-time and have children, but if you keep going it is worth it in the end, she said.

 

Experience with CNM

She loves the teachers; she loves how they work with students, she said.

“They understand that we have lives outside of school, that we don’t take our education for granted,” she said, “They understood us.”

 

 

Amanda Martin

Amanda Martin

Integrated Studies

 

Plans after graduation

She is going to UNM in the fall for a bachelor’s and ultimately a Master’s in Management Information Systems. She wants to make sure everyone and their information is safe, secure, and protected, she said.

 

Experience with CNM

“Teachers are always there to help, it’s been a great experience,” she said.

 

 Alexander Little

Alexander Little

Computer Information Systems

 

Advice for students

Look for jobs and internships before you graduate because it can take a while, he said.

Doing something at the same time can make school a little less disparaging, he said.

 

Experience with CNM

He really liked the small classes, he said.

“It was really neat to have 1-on-1 time with my professors,” he said.

 

 

Antonio Downie

Antonio Downie

Integrated Studies and Network Administration

 

Plans after graduation

“I figured I’ve been doing it for so long and fixing all this different stuff, it’s good to have the education behind it because it makes you remarkable,” he said.

 

Experience with CNM

“Teachers really give you a chance,” he said.

 

 

Esteban Garcia

Esteban Garcia

Associates in Welding Technologies

 

Advice for students

“Just work hard, man. It’s all about what you put into it,” he said.

 

Experience with CNM

“The instructors from the welding program are awesome. They really care about the students and want you to go forward. They really care about your future,” he said.

 

 

Nicole Gutierrez

Nicole Gutierrez

Associates in Welding

 

Plans after graduation

She is looking for a job in town and after she has saved some money she is going to fix up her truck and take it across country to work in the piping industry and see the country, too, she said.

 

Advice for students

“Just work really hard and stay at it and the rewards will come,” she said.

 

Experience with CNM

She loved her welding program and instructors, she said.

“They are amazing; they put in way more time and effort than any other instructors,” she said.

 

 

jennifer langdon
Photo provided by Jessica Langdon

Jennifer Langdon

Degree- Accounting, Associates

 

Advice for students attending CNM?

“Do the work, go for whatever your passion is, I changed my major four times. Even if you don’t find something right away that works, keep trying, there’s something out there that you will fall in love with,” she said.

 

 

 kellei schear

Kellei Schear

Degree- Culinary Arts, Associates  

 

What was your favorite thing about taking classes at CNM?

Every instructor seemed like they really wanted the best for their students and that they were there to help in whatever way possible, she said.

 

 

hannah gajeton

Hannah Gajeton

Degree- Business Administration, Associates

 

Plans for the future?

“I want to follow in my dad’s footsteps, he’s got a million master’s degrees, he’s got a really good job and I kind of want to follow in his footsteps with school. I want to learn as much as I can,” she said.

 

 

marissa gonzalez

Marissa Gonzalez

Degree- Biology, Associates

 

Advice for students attending CNM?

“Don’t do something that you’re going to be unhappy with because I have seen so many people who have done things that they’re not happy with and they are just miserable at their jobs,” she said.

 

 

patrick

Patrick Hurtado

Degree- General engineering, Associates

 

What led you to this career path?

 He has been driving race cars since he was eight years old, so racing played a major role in his life, as well as working on cars and doing automotive engineering, he said.

 

 

 

Students speak out about financial aid changes

By Daniel Montaño, Staff Reporter | Photos By Daniel Montaño
CNM’s new financial aid policies have students’ best interests at heart, but the students’ themselves have had mixed reactions to the new loan revisions.
The Chronicle asked students receiving financial aid how these changes will affect their student loans.
The new policies, which will begin in the fall 2013 semester, will reduce the maximum amount of money that students can take out in loans per year by $2000, and increase the yearly award for work-study employees by $1500, Joseph Ryan, administrative director of Financial Aid, said.
The policies have been put in place in order to reduce the chance that students will default on student loans after they graduate by lowering students’ overall debt, Ryan said.

Jeanie Castillo, Surgical Technology major Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?  “I have two kids and having the loans helps me with my children, because in my program they expect you not to work.  They actually tell you during intro; ‘that’s why you have the loans’. “They tell you to get loans to help pull you through the term so you can concentrate on the program.  Not having the full loans only gives you a certain amount of money that can’t cover rent and electricity and everyday costs.” Chronicle: Do you think the increase in work study will help students cover those everyday costs?  “I don’t think so because once you are in a program or even taking classes full time you’re not going to have time to do that work-study.  “I mean, in the Surgical Tech program we’ll have clinics all week long and we’re not going to have time to do work-study after class.  I mean maybe for an hour but that’s not going to come close to covering what we would get from loans.  So, basically, students are screwed.”
Jeanie Castillo, Surgical Technology major
Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?
“I have two kids and having the loans helps me with my children, because in my program they expect you not to work. They actually tell you during intro; ‘that’s why you have the loans’.
“They tell you to get loans to help pull you through the term so you can concentrate on the program. Not having the full loans only gives you a certain amount of money that can’t cover rent and electricity and everyday costs.”
Chronicle: Do you think the increase in work study will help students cover those everyday costs?
“I don’t think so because once you are in a program or even taking classes full time you’re not going to have time to do that work-study.
“I mean, in the Surgical Tech program we’ll have clinics all week long and we’re not going to have time to do work-study after class. I mean maybe for an hour but that’s not going to come close to covering what we would get from loans. So, basically, students are screwed.”

Corinne Kilgore, Pre-Health Sciences major Chronicle: What’s your reaction to the changes in Financial Aid’s policies?  “I have to say that for me personally, I kind of like it. “I do think that we’re in a dangerous situation where people are taking out all these loans and then they get out into the real world and, with the way the economy is, they can’t find a job.  Then they have to immediately start paying back all these loans and can’t. “So I can see the reasoning as to why they want to raise the work-study and lower the loans but on the other hand, work-study is only $8.50 an hour and you can only do 20 hours a week, or even now with 30 hours during the summer, people aren’t going to be able to pay their bills on that. “If they don’t have the loans to back them up then they may be forced to drop out of school to get a full time job.” “I can see both sides of it I guess because I’m a little unbiased.  I don’t do work study or loans. I’m one of the lucky ones that have been able to get by with just my Pell grant.”
Corinne Kilgore, Pre-Health Sciences major
Chronicle: What’s your reaction to the changes in Financial Aid’s policies?
“I have to say that for me personally, I kind of like it.
“I do think that we’re in a dangerous situation where people are taking out all these loans and then they get out into the real world and, with the way the economy is, they can’t find a job. Then they have to immediately start paying back all these loans and can’t.
“So I can see the reasoning as to why they want to raise the work-study and lower the loans but on the other hand, work-study is only $8.50 an hour and you can only do 20 hours a week, or even now with 30 hours during the summer, people aren’t going to be able to pay their bills on that.
“If they don’t have the loans to back them up then they may be forced to drop out of school to get a full time job.”
“I can see both sides of it I guess because I’m a little unbiased. I don’t do work study or loans. I’m one of the lucky ones that have been able to get by with just my Pell grant.”

Jack Pettigrew, Biology major Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?  “I don’t think the lower loans will affect me personally, but I definitely think it will affect some of the students here. “My girlfriend for example, she pays rent on her own apartment and her rent is kind of expensive because she pays it all in advance and now I don’t think she’ll be able to take out a loan big enough in order to pay her rent.  So she might struggle a little bit” Chronicle: How do you think this might affect students in general?  “I think if people need those loans to pay their bills they will probably drop out, only because the work-study pays minimum wage.  So they probably won’t be able to pay for what they need.”
Jack Pettigrew, Biology major
Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?
“I don’t think the lower loans will affect me personally, but I definitely think it will affect some of the students here.
“My girlfriend for example, she pays rent on her own apartment and her rent is kind of expensive because she pays it all in advance and now I don’t think she’ll be able to take out a loan big enough in order to pay her rent. So she might struggle a little bit”
Chronicle: How do you think this might affect students in general?
“I think if people need those loans to pay their bills they will probably drop out, only because the work-study pays minimum wage. So they probably won’t be able to pay for what they need.”

Jesse Hawthorne, Welding major Chronicle: What’s your reaction to the changes in Financial Aid’s policies?   “It’s going to affect me greatly because I don’t have work-study.  I have to pull out those loans and I have a job. I don’t have work-study because every time I look into it, they’re all filled up; there are hardly any jobs available. “So that’ll affect me greatly.  I rely on that; I only have about another year left, but because this is starting in the fall semester it’s going to affect me greatly.  I’m going to have to find another job or something. “Even if you’re aloud $1500 more through work-study but they’re taking $2000 off of loans, that’s a $500 dollar difference.  When you’re a broke-ass college kid like myself it’s hard enough as it is.   “If they’re cutting loans by $2000 dollars, I mean that’s four months of rent right there that I usually pay out when I get those loans.  That’s essentially what that’ll be for me.” Chronicle: In the long run do you think this will help you stay out of debt and reduce your chances of defaulting on a loan?  “Well, if I were to stay in school and continue on to UNM afterwards it could potentially help me.  But the fact of the matter is that here (at CNM) we are taking out such a small amount anyway because it’s our first couple of years. “I’m going to be about $20,000 in debt, but when I leave here I’m going to be working and making more than enough money to pay that off.  This is not really going to help me out.  It’ll actually hurt me because it’ll be harder for me to stay in school. “If they make it easier for us to stay in school we can then get a better job and pay them back easier.  If it’s harder for us to stay in school, how are we going to pay back those loans as easily? It doesn’t make sense, at least not to me.”
Jesse Hawthorne, Welding major
Chronicle: What’s your reaction to the changes in Financial Aid’s policies?
“It’s going to affect me greatly because I don’t have work-study. I have to pull out those loans and I have a job. I don’t have work-study because every time I look into it, they’re all filled up; there are hardly any jobs available.
“So that’ll affect me greatly. I rely on that; I only have about another year left, but because this is starting in the fall semester it’s going to affect me greatly. I’m going to have to find another job or something.
“Even if you’re aloud $1500 more through work-study but they’re taking $2000 off of loans, that’s a $500 dollar difference. When you’re a broke-ass college kid like myself it’s hard enough as it is.
“If they’re cutting loans by $2000 dollars, I mean that’s four months of rent right there that I usually pay out when I get those loans. That’s essentially what that’ll be for me.”
Chronicle: In the long run do you think this will help you stay out of debt and reduce your chances of defaulting on a loan?
“Well, if I were to stay in school and continue on to UNM afterwards it could potentially help me. But the fact of the matter is that here (at CNM) we are taking out such a small amount anyway because it’s our first couple of years.
“I’m going to be about $20,000 in debt, but when I leave here I’m going to be working and making more than enough money to pay that off. This is not really going to help me out. It’ll actually hurt me because it’ll be harder for me to stay in school.
“If they make it easier for us to stay in school we can then get a better job and pay them back easier. If it’s harder for us to stay in school, how are we going to pay back those loans as easily?
It doesn’t make sense, at least not to me.”

 

Magen Wells, Integrated Studies major, transferring to UNM for nursing Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?   “Well I graduated and I’m going to UNM in the fall but I think it’s going to really affect the single parents who are trying really hard to make something of themselves.  Being a single mother going back to school was the one thing that I could do, that I knew I needed to do, because I was left with nothing. “Being in school has done a lot of things for me.  It’s kept me afloat financially, it’s been able to progress me towards my big goal and I really think it’s going to affect single moms, single dads and lower class citizens who are trying to do better. Chronicle: Was it the student loans themselves that actually enabled you to go to school? “Yes, because if the full student loans weren’t available to me I wouldn’t have been able to go to class, because I would have had to work.  You’re stuck between a rock and a hard place.  You’re either going to school, getting student loan money to keep you afloat, or you’re working. “It’s one or the other because then something will fail if you’re going to school and trying to work at the same time.  There’s always one that you’re weaker at that catches up to you and you struggle with.
Magen Wells, Integrated Studies major, transferring to UNM for nursing
Chronicle: How is the change in Financial Aid’s policy going to affect you?
“Well I graduated and I’m going to UNM in the fall but I think it’s going to really affect the single parents who are trying really hard to make something of themselves. Being a single mother going back to school was the one thing that I could do, that I knew I needed to do, because I was left with nothing.
“Being in school has done a lot of things for me. It’s kept me afloat financially, it’s been able to progress me towards my big goal and I really think it’s going to affect single moms, single dads and lower class citizens who are trying to do better.
Chronicle: Was it the student loans themselves that actually enabled you to go to school?
“Yes, because if the full student loans weren’t available to me I wouldn’t have been able to go to class, because I would have had to work. You’re stuck between a rock and a hard place. You’re either going to school, getting student loan money to keep you afloat, or you’re working.
“It’s one or the other because then something will fail if you’re going to school and trying to work at the same time. There’s always one that you’re weaker at that catches up to you and you struggle with.

‘Leonardo Literary Magazine’ release party announced

By: Adriana Avila, Managing Editor | Photo Illustration By: Jonathan Gamboa, Production Manager

Previous issues of the “Leonardo Literary Magazine.”
Previous issues of the “Leonardo Literary Magazine.”

The 2013 edition of “Leonardo Literary Magazine” is scheduled to be released next month, said “Leonardo” adviser and Full-time Creative Writing instructor Patrick Houlihan.

The release party for this year’s edition will be held at the Main campus Student Resource Center on April 5 where stu­dents will have the opportunity to share their works during the festivities, he said.

“It’s a celebration of what’s in it. Anyone who is published in it can stand up and read their stuff and pick up copies, share them with friends,” he said.

“Leonardo” is funded by through student activ­ity fees and prints only 250 copies of each edition, which are free, he said.

With the increase of student interest, “Leonardo” has grown from tabloid size to an actual magazine length, he said.

“It’s grown and sta­bilized over the years to where it’s now a 50 or 60 page magazine full color and student activities has been great at funding the increase costs. Paper and ink took a huge jump about five or seven years ago,” he said.

Being published is a big step for people and it helps a great deal to write it on resumes, he said.

“It’s a wonderful resume line to say ‘I’m a published author or artist selected,’” Houlihan said.

English major and “Leonardo” editor Shaya Rogers said it is a privilege to review student works because this year’s submis­sions were impressive.

“Giving students the opportunity to share their creative work is a positive aspect of the CNM community and I am so happy to support that,” Rogers said.

Rogers, who also works as the features reporter for the CNM Chronicle, has three nature photos and two poems featured in the magazine: one about her challenges with monog­amy and the other an ode to her sister who commit­ted suicide when she was a teenager, she said.

Business and Communications major and layout designer Jonathan Gamboa, who also works at the produc­tion manager for the CNM Chronicle, said he enjoys designing the magazine because it gives him the opportunity be creative.

“I think it’s fun. Since I am the only one designing, it allows me to have more freedom in producing the magazine,” Gamboa said.

This is Gamboa’s second design year and his role for “Leonardo” extends further profes­sionally from the mouse and screen, he said.

“I really did get pro­fessional experience doing it the first year because I was having to stay in touch with the printers and coordinat­ing the release party with the editors, along with setting my own deadlines to finish the magazine,” he said.

Houlihan said “Leonardo” used to be a semester project for the Business and Graphics department, but the magazine became the work of volunteer stu­dents after the pro­gram was cut a couple of years ago.

Submissions for “Leonardo” for 2014 are now being accepted and deadline for works will probably be in early January 2014, he said.

Houlihan hopes to continue the works of “Leonardo” because of the community’s great reviews and the benefits students receive when published, he said.

“It’s a nice repre­sentation of us to the community and I’d hate for it to disappear,” Houlihan said.