Women’s Trade Summit

Story by

Devonny Grajeda

Staff Reporter

Official poster for the Women’s Trade Summit.

The women’s trade summit is an event that will help women look for a job and networking opportunities within the areas of HVAC, plumbing, carpentry, diesel mechanics, insulators, laborers, electricians, and more said Amy Ballard, Dean for the school of Applied Technologies.

The event will take place Friday, March 18th from 9am-3pm at the CNM main campus inside Smith Brasher hall.

This event can help women find mentorships as well as allow them an opportunity to ask questions directly to women who are working in trade fields right now, she said. 

There will be speakers such as presidents and representatives of companies, there will also be a panel consisting of women who work in different trades and they will be speaking on issues they have had to deal with inside their individual fields, she added.

This event is important for many reasons, the first reason being the ability to learn about the types of compensation, what kind of job availability there is, and what kind of opportunities can come from a career in trades for women, she said.

Then there is a need to let women know that there is incredible demand out for these positions out there right now she added.

Lastly, these jobs create great pathways to even better jobs, she said.

“For example, even if you start as a carpenter or plumber it’s not a far step to creating your own business or becoming a manager. Women may not realize that these jobs can be a launchpad to bigger and better things, there is a lot of money to be made these days, ” she said.

Companies are in need of highly skilled trade people she said. So much so that right now some companies have billboards advertising that they will offer up to a $10,000 sign on bonus for skilled HVAC employees. 

Getting involved in trades is not something that can be started tomorrow she said.

Education and training are required, but it will not be too long before a women can receive a high paying job she added.

“We would also like to see a stronger presence of women inside trades considering it is a male dominated field, the transition for women is happening in politics, medicine, science so there is no reason why trade fields can’t be the next frontier for women to become pivotal and pioneering“ she said.

Women can really empower themselves by hearing the stories of other women who also felt scared to take the leap into a male dominated field, but who are now successful and own their own businesses and love the trades, she said. 

“We hope the event will become a spring board for these speakers and mentors to help start something much greater for women in trades,” she said. 

The event will have vender booths from different companies such as Sandia Labs, Meta(FaceBook), and APD for those looking for jobs, she said.

If interested in attending this event you may sign up using the link provided below.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/new-mexico-women-in-trades-summit-tickets-273089286407

Calling All Artists

Story by

Devonny Grajeda

Staff Reporter

Faculty Advisor of CNM’s visual arts magazine Leonardo, Carly Harschlip said she is inviting all CNM students to attend the first ever Leonardo Open Mic Night.

The event is for all CNM students and will be hosted via zoom on November 12th from 7:00-8:00PM she said.

If students would like to attend/preform they can email Leonardo at leonardo@cnm.edu and they will then be added to the list, she said. Or they can go to their website under Blog and Events to sign up as well, she said.

The Leonardo Open Mic Night is intended to provide students with a venue that will be fun and interactive while allowing students to show off their creative sides, “It will allow students to share their creative work and have a sense of community, which is important for them,” she said.

Finding a community that a student can share their feelings with is just as important as taking a class. It is a big step to share creative work and it can be scary, but it can also be worth it she said.

Attending the Leonardo Open Mic Night may teach a student something about themselves, they may even come to find out they might have stage fright, she said.

She said, “Being a college student is also about exploring things and finding your place in the world.”

COVID has made things a bit harder by making everyone more isolated. Of course, one Open Mic Night is not going to change everything but it is a start she said.

Students are also welcome to attend the event as audience members only and are not required to share if they do not wish too, she said.

If students do not feel ready for either of those then perhaps they may find interest in working with Leonardo, which has been a part of CNM since 1991 and is celebrating their 30th anniversary this year, she said.

She said, “Leonardo hopes to get people interested in the magazine itself. Or, to contribute if they want to be an editor perhaps at some point or they want to submit their work to it in print which is important for any beginning writer.”

Return of the Balloon Fiesta

Pictures and Story by

Salvador Zambrano

Staff Reporter/Graphic Designer

2020 was the year COVID-19 began. During the year lots of events were canceled to protect people from outbreaks of the virus. One event affected was The famous Balloon Fiesta. After taking the year off Balloon Fiesta made it’s return for the 2021 season.

Balloon fiesta park was filled with many spectators waiting to see the many balloons take off into the sky. This year 866,414 guests made their way to the park during the 9 day period.

The Balloon fiesta picked up right where it left off with a total of 588 balloons making an appearance this year. 671 pilots also made the trip from around the world for this years event. The Albuquerque community seemed full of life after the return of the Balloon Fiesta.

Construction on Catering/Brewery Enters the Black Phase

Story and Photos by

Mark Graven

Staff Reporter

Construction on the Catering Brewery Facility at Robert P. Matteuchi Hall continues, and has entered the Black Phase, as pictured on September 28.

The project has already passed through yellow and light blue phases, but must undergo a metamorphosis into creamy white, before it is complete, according to architectural renderings prepared by FBT Architects of Albuquerque.

A rendering of the project, as finished, is displayed on a fence at the construction site on University Boulevard, just south of CNM’ s newly constructed Market Place.

General Contractor for the project is Brycon Construction of Albuquerque.

A Celebration with Sol

Story and Photos by

Angela Harrington

Staff Reporter

CNM’s first ever post virtual graduation ceremony celebration was a success!
Graduating students and their friends and families lined up in their vehicles to make their way through the Smith-Brasher parking lot on Saturday May 1st, and patiently waited to be cheered and revered for the successes they have accomplished.
Sol the Suncat was there to make sure it was a lively time!
The route was lined with faculty and staff, clapping and waving, as each graduate rolled up and got out of their vehicle to be presented with a beautiful diploma cover and other school memorabilia.
As the traditional Pomp and Circumstance March played over the loud speaker, Dean of Students Chris Cavazos busily coordinated the announcement of each graduate’s name as they arrived.
CNM President Tracy Hartzler greeted the graduates and happily posed for quick photos with them as they made their way around the stage area, where CNM Board Members and additional faculty were waiting to congratulate them.
There was no shortage of enthusiasm or elation at the socially distanced and masked celebration.

See slide show below

Pre-Recorded Graduation Ceremony – Take Two

Story by Angela Harrington

Photos by CNM Chronicle

Staff Reporter

This year’s CNM graduation ceremony, scheduled for May 1st at 12 noon, will be virtual again, according to CNM Dean of Students, Chris Cavazos.

“A lot of factors played into the decision to go virtual” said Cavazos.

Cavazos said that the decision to hold a virtual ceremony had to be made in advance due to the need to procure vendors and the venue.

He said that normally they use Tingley Coliseum or Expo New Mexico to hold in-person ceremonies, but due to the pandemic these venues were not an option.

“Obviously we didn’t expect to be doing another virtual ceremony a year later. Last year was kind of a spur of the moment, let’s put something together and go for it [situation]” he said.

Due to timelines and the need for planning, the decision to remain virtual was made in late February, and confirmed in the middle of March, according to Cavazos.

“We are aware of other schools, especially APS, who are holding in-person ceremonies; but we had already at that point decided to do virtual for planning purposes” he said.

There is still some chance for an in-person drive-through recognition celebration, on the same day as the virtual ceremony, said Cavazos.

The proposed celebration may consist of a drive-through diploma pick-up in front of the Student Services Center, according to Cavazos.

He said, “The celebration that we’re hoping to plan is going to be more about fun and recognition. Kind of like when you walk out of the ceremony and you start cheering and clapping. That’s what the celebration piece will be.”

It may be a chance for graduating students to put on the cap and gown, if they choose to, and celebrate at a distance, according to Cavazos.

He said that this has not been fully approved yet but that he hopes to have a decision and final details pertaining to this in the next week or so.

Cavazos said, “Cap and gown are not required for the virtual ceremony. However, graduation items are available to purchase through Jostens.”

What is for certain though, is that the virtual graduation ceremony will be available to family and friends from anywhere in the world, by attending online, according to Cavazos.

“There are some pluses, some positives, to a virtual ceremony” Cavazos said.

Cavazos encourages graduates to participate in the virtual ceremony. If a student believes that they are eligible to participate, but they have not received an email with instructions, please contact the Student Activities office or email graduationceremony@cnm.edu.

According to Cavazos there are some deadlines for signing up. To have your name appear in the program, you must sign up by April 9th. To be part of the recording and have your name read out loud, the deadline is April 16th.

“I would definitely encourage participation, although it’s not as ideal as an in-person ceremony, such as previous graduates and future graduates will be able to experience” said Cavazos.

Students have earned the opportunity to participate in a ceremony and it’s their day, he said.

“Everyone is going to remember this time forever. So why not say, I graduated during a pandemic? That makes it an even bigger accomplishment, if you ask me” Cavazos said.

He said that the school wants the students to be recognized for their accomplishments.

“CNM is doing the best we can with what’s available now and what we’re allowed, to make it a memorable day” stated Cavazos.

Additional information about the proposed accompanying drive-through celebration will be made available as soon as the decision is finalized, said Cavazos.

He said, “For all our students, graduating or not, just to be successful in their education during this time of crisis, is really something to recognize and be proud of.” The Chronicle will continue to keep you updated as more information becomes available.

The Games That Are Getting Us Through

Story and Photo

By Angela Harrington

Staff Reporter

 Psychology major Isaiah Theodis said that game play has been a great way for him to get away from the stresses of not seeing friends.

He does still get out and partake in some outdoor activities, but playing Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) with friends and online role-playing games (RPG) has helped him get through the social distancing that has become a way of life over the last year, he said.

 “I generally like the RPG games because it kind of gets you away from what you are doing and puts your mind in a different place,” said Theodis.

 Theodis recommends games like Minecraft because players can let their imaginations fly by building things like mansions or castles, he said.

Photo of the Game Survive

 He stated, “With a lot of those action adventure games, the concept is just destroying, but at the end of the day, building something is a lot more fun and productive.”

He said he likes board and card games as well.

“I have been making my parents pretty mad lately with UNO. It’s hard for people to smoke me in UNO, that’s like one of my favorite things,” said Theodis.

Geography instructor Justin Fuller said Uno is one of his family’s favorites, but they also play Chutes-and-Ladders, Connect Four, and Go Fish, among others.

 “I introduced my kids to Battleship, which they liked with the hunting and finding your opponent and using the Grid-type, almost a map, to record where you and your opponent’s ships are located,” Fuller said.

If you are looking for something different to play maybe try a game called SURVIVE Escape From Atlantis! (Currently being played by a member of the CNM Chronicle Staff). The idea of the game is to save people on an island, before a volcano erupts.

Click the link here for more game ideas.

ECOS working on Improving Remote Learning

Story by

Mark Graven

Staff Reporter

CNM’s Executive Council of Students (ECOS) is working on a letter to CNM administration regarding concerns about remote learning– the primary method of instruction at CNM during  Covid times, although some “hands on” classes have returned to campus on a restricted basis.
ECOS Vice President Imane Bahji. said she would draft a letter taking up concerns and suggestions students might have about remote learning.  
ECOS board members said they would take up the draft letter at their next meeting which will be conducted remotely on October 9.  (See CNM ECOS web page for details.)

ECOS President Alex Crossland said the CNM administration might be under a false impression that the “school is doing well,” with remote learning. 

“It just feels like we are on a downward trend”

Said crossland

Bahji repeated a concern that she voiced at two previous ECOS meetings:  that remote classes lack a lecture component where students can interact with professors, ask questions, and clarify concepts.  Bahji says she fears that students feel frustrated when they don’t understand concepts, so that the may withdraw from classes, and ultimately drop out of school.
Bahji said many students are seeking “outside resources”  to acquire the understanding the expected to get from their CNM course. 
Cleopatra Romero, a CNM student, who wants to join the ECOS board,  ( See ECOS website for information on how to join ECOS.) said students could be more assertive in contacting their professor with questions.  

“We should encourage students to get in touch with their professor, if they are having trouble,”

SAid Romero


Kristopher Gaussoin, director of student life and discipline at CNM, the advisor for ECOS board, said students should be careful about using outside resources, such as UNM course materials, in that there may be legal implications– such as copyright laws involved.
Gaussoin said that ECOS has a “very powerful voice” in how the school is run,  and that the administration “cares about your opinion.” 
“You should use your power positively,” urged Gaussoin, noting that how ECOS packages its message could play an important part in getting results.
Meanwhile ECOS continues to seek input from students through its Suggestion Box on it CNM web page.  That input can be made anonymously, according to ECOS outreach officer, Colin Stapleton.
Crossland said that he was hopeful that ECOS could improve remote learning in the future, but also effect some change in the current fall semester.

HUMANOIDS GO TO MARKET

Story and Photos by

Mark Graven

Staff Reporter.

Human-like figures have been spotted in CNM’s newest building, The Market Place–even though, it is not yet open to the public.
Brycon Constuction said the figures are actually plastic mannequins, that will don appropriate CNM apparrell when the market place and it’s new book store do open.  
Racks for books have already been installed, and shoppers will be able to take a break at a Starbucks that is also expected to be housed in the building, Brycon workers said.
Although the building seems almost ready for use, CNM has not yet announced an opening date, although the builders have said the building would be done this fall.

Take A Virtual Balloon Ride with The ABQ Balloon Museum

Story and photos by

Olawale Oluwakoya

Staff Reporter 

CNM students should participate in the Balloon museum virtual field trip because 

Anderson Abruzzo international Balloon Museum

it is fun, educative, informative and a great opportunity to acquire a wealth of knowledge without leaving their couch, said Balloon Museum’s Field Trip and Volunteer Coordinator Katie Farmin. 

The Virtual Field Trips will take place every Tuesday and Thursday at 9:30 am, the lesson is approximately 40 minutes and will be a mix of PowerPoint, video, and some movement, she said. 

The field trip will cover the history of early ballooning, the anatomy of a balloon, the science behind balloon flight, and a short history of the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, she said.

Photo Puzzle Exhibit at the Balloon Museum

“The available dates for the virtual field trips will be provided in the registration form (here). You will have a first and second choice, however, they are not guaranteed. If your choices are not available, you will be contacted to coordinate other possible choices,” she said. 

“Once you register, a confirmation email will be sent out with the date of the field trip. You have the choice of the museum sending a Zoom link, Google Meet link, or we can pop into your class if you have a recurring link with whatever platform you are using for your digital classroom,” she said.

Exhibition at the balloon Museum dedicated to Brave Airfare

After the field trip, another email will be sent out with additional material for students to reflect on what they learned, she said. 

If students have any more questions they can send an email kfarmin@cabq.gov or call (505) 768-6027, said Katie Farmin.